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micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.

This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 

African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” Follow micdotcom

Source: micdotcom
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blackgirlnerds:

Meteor Man: Will There Ever Be Another Black Superhero?

At the end of the summer, we will still find ourselves without a major mainstream film with a central/title superhero of color. Comic fans know that Captain America will be black and there is still talks of a Black Panther film that sometimes looks as if it will never come to fruition. And a woman of color with her own superhero film: forget it. The only representation we have are fan films.

Li…

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Source: blackgirlnerds
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dark-radiant-mind:

pregnantzombie:

note-a-bear:

chauvinistsushi:

sourcedumal:

boosabe:

spiritgun:

liftedandgiftedd:

3 people stealing the same bike [video]

smh…

entirely fed up with this world 

Damn….

Racism right here.

White people steal, and it’s BRUSHED OFF AND OTHER PEOPLE HELP

Black person? MOB of people come to attack him.

*lies down*

but it’s all in our heads though

This shit is infuriating

They helped the white girl steal it. Not just let her steal it, but HELPED her steal it.

(via reverseracism)

Source: unvitation
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thistangledtongue:

fandomsandfeminism:

dirtydarwin:

brute-reason:

Still Not a Joke — Good Awareness Campaign From Just Detention International

What if your kid went to jail for trying pot, something that is very probable if your kid is black and living in a state like Texas. Does that mean they deserve to be raped? Does that mean that they should live in conditions that go against all human rights?

Most prison rapes are committed by prison staff. Even if you are heartless and do not care about the prisoners, remember that these prison staff rapists go home to their nice houses in the outside world. Remember that they are your neighbors, maybe they even have babysat your children. Remember that as long as some victims are dehumanized and ignored, many perpetrators will never be caught. And yes, these perpetrators do pose a threat to you and your family. Prison rape, rape in generalis everybody’s problem. And definitely not a fucking joke. 

The idea that prisoners “deserve” to be raped is part of rape culture.
Rape is not a punishment. It can not be earned. It is a crime every single time, no matter what, no matter who the victim is.

No one deserves to be sexually assaulted in any way. NO ONE.

(via reverseracism)

Source: brutereason
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"Style has a profound meaning to Black Americans. If we can’t drive, we will invent walks and the world will envy the dexterity of our feet. If we can’t have ham, we will boil chitterlings; if we are given rotten peaches, we will make cobblers; if given scraps, we will make quilts; take away our drums, and we will clap our hands. We prove the human spirit will prevail. We will take what we have to make what we need. We need confidence in our knowledge of who we are."

-

Nikki Gionvanni

File this under facts on facts.

This makes me think of a beautiful post that I mentioned in one of my Read This Week features; a post by @HarrietThugman about Black people of other cultural backgrounds who diminish Black American culture, and shouldn’t….for it is so rich.

My cultural heritage involves a mixture of my love for some things specific to Jamaican culture (because of my background, being raised in a Jamaican family by Jamaican parents, but being raised in America and actually born in America) and some things specific to being an American Black (I love how Nikki says Black is the NOUN and American is the adjective), and some things that seems to connect Black people despite where in the diaspora we are.

(via gradientlair)

Yes!!!

(via goldacrylicnails)

(via locksandglasses)

Source: gradientlair
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biological-warfare:

giveme-brandy-onmybreath:

mitsurugi:

gordonjramsay:

skypestripper:

aclorable:

aclorable:

aclorable:

which country has the most birds

portugeese

wait

thats a language

portugull

nice recovery

don’t you mean nice redovery

turkey, how did we miss turkey

(via kyliesparks27)

Source: hyclropump
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majiinboo:

  • Do not forget Michael Brown
  • Do not forget how the media dehumanized him and tried to justify his murder
  • Do not forget how peaceful protests were painted as savage riots
  • Do not forget police armed with military grade weapons terrorized and arrested black civilians
  • Do not forget Darren Wilson being awarded over $200,000 in fundraiser donations for murdering an unarmed black child
  • Do not forget that this system was not built to defend us, but to control us
  • Do not forget Ferguson 

(via wilwheaton)

Source: majiinboo
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america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 

August 20th, 2014

Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”

SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.

Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.

Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.

"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."

Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.

Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.

As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.

She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying ”We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”

(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)

(via reverseracism)

Source: america-wakiewakie